Report on the 2nd Oceania Transgenic Technology/Cryopreservation Symposium

2nd oceania symposium

The 2nd Oceania Transgenic Technology and Cryopreservation Symposium was held at the University of Tasmania’s Medical Sciences Precinct, Hobart, Australia on the 18th-19th of November, 2015. The meeting was a great success with for 48 participants from 23 research institutions across Australia, New Zealand, Japan and the USA and with the support of 9 sponsoring companies. The Organising Committee comprised of: Paul Scowen-chair and host (UTAS), Elizabeth Williams (University of Queensland Biological Resources), Kevin Taylor (Australian BioResources,) Irma Villaflor (Children’s Medical Research Institute, Westmead), Tanya Templeton (Australian Phenomics Network, Monash) and Karen Brennan (Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute). Once again, it provided an opportunity for networking, for keeping up to date with the latest developments in transgenic technologies and for sharing knowledge through expertise, round table discussions and hands-on experience.

Highlights of the Programme:

The symposium began with a warm welcome from the host, Paul Scowen, and quickly moved on, beginning with a session of talks related to assisted reproduction techniques and their applications. Dr. Toru Takeo (Kumamoto University, Japan) , started by showing that ‘ultra-ovulation’ of female mice through the administration of a novel anti-serum (soon available as a commercial product) allows for consistent collection of a large number of usable oocytes from a single mouse. Combined with the IVF media products developed by the same group, mouse IVF techniques are now even further enhanced. Elizabeth Williams (UQBR) demonstrated that the CARD embryo vitrification technique can be adapted to use either straws or vials as the cryostorage vessel, allowing facilities to update their freezing techniques without having to change their liquid nitrogen storage equipment. An entertaining presentation was delivered by Prof. John McLaughlin, showing that cryovials can be easily converted with the new ‘Cryofork spatula’ to allow for easy vitrification of embryos in small media volumes. Rodrick Rupan described the challenges faced in rederiving immunodeficient colonies and how they were overcome. Continuing the rederivation and IVF theme, Mary-anne Migotto explained how UQBR have used IVF techniques to offer a rapid and large scale rederivation service. Tanya Templeton expanded upon her talk from the first Oceania symposium, giving an update on developments in ICSI technique and use of piezo methodology at Monash University. The session concluded with Julie Stanley’s talk on sperm cryopreservation at WEHI.

 

The second session covered various aspects of rodent health screening, biosecurity, monitoring, risk assessment and challenges when dealing with genetically modified mice models. Dr Trasti presented key concepts for a rodent sentinel program, establishing exclusion criteria, sample collection, interpretation of report and preparation of an action plan in case of an outbreak situation. Dr Villaflor discussed recommendations on which pathogens to monitor, issues with working with humanized immune deficient mice, quality control system and her experiences with adapting the latest trend in laboratory animal health monitoring programs. Dr Stevenson shared his insights on an appropriate scoring system for determining what agents and factors pose a risk to animal facilities housing genetically modified animals.

 

The third and final session of the day covered aspects of quality control. Sue Raboczyj (UQBR) and John Swift (OHIO) explained clearly the Quality Assurance and Control requirements for operating transgenic facilities with multiple clients, and ensuring the ongoing maintenance of a growing archive of cryopreserved material. Dr. Takeo also presented the methods used to establish a robust infrastructure at CARD (Kumamoto University). The day concluded with a personal account of undergoing the NATA accreditation process from Barbara Hunt (ANU).

Day 2 began with an extremely informative session on CRISPR technology. Kevin Taylor began with a talk on the introduction to CRISPR, the theory behind its evolution, the applications and advances based on his experiences at ABR in Moss Vale. Kevin also mentioned about the new refinements such as SCR7 and also briefly talked about electroporation. Fabien Delerue (UNSW) reported on the traditional methods utilised for creating knock-outs versus CRISPR/Cas9 and followed on with details of some of the projects that he is undertaking at UNSW and what he has done to refine how he carries out his projects being that he is a small outfit. Sandie Piltz’s work at the University of Adelaide is one of the pioneering Australian groups to start working with this technology, she discussed her personal experience with this methodology and what they have done to refine the technique, such as donor strains and ages, recipient strains, needle parameters, injection reagents and concentrations, environmental influences and superovulation techniques. Fiona Waters (WEHI) gave an introduction on the CRISPR/Cas9 methodology and then launched into the experiences from the WEHI team on how they have utilised and transferred their skills to this technique and the refinements they have made. Dirk Truman (APN) talked about the services that the APN provides, their efficiencies and that it is one of the first non-for-profit services offering this type of genome editing to Australian Researchers. Dirk also discussed the different species that are being used for this type of genome editing, off target effects, and what APN has done to refine the technique. The last talk for this session, Michelle Brownlee (ABR), talked about the day in the life of a microinjectionist. She discussed the strains of mice used, superovulation techniques, injection techniques, embryo transfer methods, refinements and troubleshooting.

The following session encompassed the administration and training aspects of working in a transgenic animal facility. Tracy Doan (UQBR) gave an overview of the database systems used and administrative support provided to help coordinate the cryopreservation and rederivation services at the Transgenic Animal Service of Queensland. Kevin Taylor (ABR) and Keri Smith (UTas) presented their respective training programs based on structure which also opened up lively discussions on different training opportunities offered in various institutions and suggestions to meet training needs of staff members. Dr David Steele who is Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) Chairman at the University of Tasmania, outlined the structure and important role and function of the IBC, including dealing with GMOs when conducting research in accordance with legislation, codes of practice and licensing requirements.

It is envisioned that future meetings will serve to strengthen our collaboration efforts with colleagues from various institutions doing the same type of work.

The TT2014-associated Zebrafish Transgenesis Workshop: 8-10 October 2014 in Edinburgh

The TT2014-associated Zebrafish Transgenesis Workshop: 8-10 October 2014 in Edinburgh
The TT2014-associated Zebrafish Transgenesis Workshop: 8-10 October 2014 in Edinburgh

Immediately after the 12th Transgenic Technology (TT2014) meeting, a unique hands-on zebrafish transgenesis workshop will be taking place in Edinburgh, on October 8-10, 2014. This will be the first non-rodent hands-on transgenic workshop ever organized after a TT meeting. This workshop is offered to willing participants registered to attend the TT2014 meeting (October 6-8, 2014). Registration is handled separately and, at first, intended participants should submit their expression of interest to Organizers. Please note that attendance at this meeting is limited to 20 participants only. Due also to high demand for places, there is a selection process in place for all applicants wishing to attend the workshop. Applications should be sent, along with proof of registration to the following email address: zebrafish_tt2014@transtechsociety.org by June 30, 2014. Decisions on the successful applicants will be communicated by July 15, 2014.

The zebrafish is fast becoming a very significant vertebrate animal model system in scientific research; highlighted by the exponential increase in zebrafish-related publications. The role of zebrafish in science is only going to increase in the future; techniques are being constantly developed and more and more people recognise its advantages and benefits to research.

This small freshwater, tropical fish has some clear and unique advantages as a model system; these include its optical transparency, with ex-utero synchronous and rapid development, which allows direct, and continuous in-vivo observation. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation is relatively straight forward and the zebrafish is able to regenerate all organs and tissues. The fish can be maintained under very economic conditions and can be obtained in significant numbers, allowing statistically high N values. Another major advantage is that the developing zebrafish can survive for several days without a cardiovascular system, allowing examination of embryonic-lethal genotypes and phenotypes, from the single-cell stage. Whilst the zebrafish may lack certain (and some obvious) mammalian organs, and despite being physically very different, there are very important genetic and cellular similarities, with development being directly comparable to humans.

The workshop ‘An Introduction to Zebrafish Transgenesis’ follows TT2014 and is the first practical workshop in a non-rodent model species. The practical sessions will start with gene expression interference using classical morpholino microinjection on Day 1, which is complemented on Day 2 with microinjection of a simple fluorescent transgene construct. The scheduled embryology sessions are separated by a wide-ranging series of talks from leading experts in aquatic transgenics. Both the tutorials and practical instruction will provide all the information needed to perform husbandry and gene manipulation in the early zebrafish embryo. Topics include: husbandry best practise, microinjection principles, transgenesis and mutagenesis using recombinases, imaging and cryopreservation.

Appointed teachers and instructors for this zebrafish workshop include: Liz Patton, Carl Tucker, Koichi Kawakami, Stephen Ekker, Keith Joung, Henry Roehl, Robert Kelsh, Martin Denvir, David Lyons, Dirk Seiger, Yi Feng and Karthikeyani Paranthaman.

If you are interested to learn how to work with this alternative vertebrate animal model do not miss this extraordinary opportunity to become familar with basic zebrafish transgenesis techniques and register your interest to attend this hands-on workshop, associated with the TT2014 meeting.

 

Meeting report: Promoting the international exchange of mouse mutant resources

Infrafrontier-IMPC workshop: Promoting the international exchange of mouse mutant resources, Munich, Germany, 8-9 May 2014
Infrafrontier-IMPC workshop: Promoting the international exchange of mouse mutant resources, Munich, Germany, 8-9 May 2014

This is a brief meeting report on the INFRAFRONTIER /IMPC workshop: Promoting the international exchange of mouse mutant resources, which was held in Munich, Germany, on 08-09 May 2014.
As indicated in the corresponding Infrafrontier web page: “The main objectives of the workshop were to discuss how to simplify the international exchange of mouse mutant resources and to define the procedural changes to achieve it, to review the key issues facing the mouse community and mouse repositories as well as focus on IP issues and to present best practices in sharing research tools. The workshop was targeted at the directors of major mouse repositories, IP and technology transfer experts, representatives of scientific journals and funders and attracted the attention of 70 participants.” Delegates from major mouse repositories (JAX, MMRRC, EMMA, CMMR, RIKEN BRC, CARD, MARC), mouse international projects and consortia (EUCOMM, EUCOMMTOOLS, KOMP, KOMP2, IKMC, IMPC, KMPC), other related consortia (SGC), scientific journals (Nature, PLOS), funding agencies (NIH), companies (BioDoc, Charles River, AddGene), associations (AMMRA, AMPC, FELASA, EARA), TTOs and lawyers from numerous institutions and end-users gathered to discuss about how to best promote the international exchange of mouse mutant resources.

This workshop was funded by the EC FP7 InfraCoMP project. InfraCoMP’s main objective is to coordinate the collaborative efforts between the Infrafrontier Research Infrastructure and the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC). The scope of this Infrafrontier-IMPC workshop in Munich included various major topics, such as:

  • to discuss about simplified procedures to effectively exchange mouse mutant resources among repositories and between repositories and end-users/customers, trying to review and fix all restrictions preventing from adequately sharing major mouse mutant resources.
  • to review the key issues currently faced by the mouse community and mouse repositories, including emerging new genome editing technologies (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs) and the role of mouse archives in the international exchange of mouse mutant resources
  • to discuss on IP issues and the administrative paperwork usually associated with any transactional international negotiation involving licenses and MTAs
  • to showcase best practices, examples of successful sharing research tools that could be applied on sharing mouse mutant resources

This workshop represented a continuation towards the eventual application of the agreements included in the so-called Rome Agenda, published in 2009 (Schofield et al. 2009, Nature) where the major headlines, best practices and recommendations concerning the deposit and sharing of biological resources, including mice, ES cells and germplasm, under the least restrictive terms possible, had been already discussed and identified but, unfortunately, not sufficiently widespread nor systematically followed, in spite of new initiatives adopted by some funding agencies, enforcing public-access policies for materials associated with projects funded by the NIH or the Wellcome Trust in order to receive the allocated funds.

The impact of the new genome editing technologies on current mouse consortia and mouse archives was discussed at length and in depth, from various angles and by different speakers. It is obvious that a new logic has emerged, the updated mouse genetics toolbox and its widespread among scientists enables them to generate their mouse mutants of interest through alternative, often faster approaches. Instead of considering the new endonuclease-mediated mutations solely a threat for traditional approaches, based on ES cell clones (however using higher genetic and quality-controlled standards), it was finally interpreted as an opportunity for mouse consortia and repositories. For example, the easier and faster generation of new mouse mutations could help finishing the functional annotations of the mouse genome, for all these loci that could not be targeted or, if targeted, did not result in the corresponding mouse strain through IKMC-IMPC current approaches.

The description of innovative shipment methods, for refrigerated biological materials, or using dry-ice, as compared to the standard but more complex liquid-nitrogen dry shippers was also discussed in order to make the distribution of mouse mutant resources cheaper and easier. The new set of sperm and oocyte cryopreservation methods and the optimized associated IVF procedures, as reported by CARD, Kumamoto University, in Japan, have also greatly contributed to promote the international exchange of mouse mutant resources, avoiding the always difficult and expensive shipment of live research laboratory animals.

The legal agreements, such as Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs), governing the access to mouse mutant resources were also discussed extensively. The complexity of some of these MTAs and the often long administrative process involved for executing them, unnecessarily extends the time required to access to a given mouse mutant strain deposited in a major repository for academic use. Interesting analyses of common practices observed within the international mouse community and applied by mouse consortia were presented (Bubela et al. 2012; Mishra and Bubela, 2014). The overall recommendation was, whenever possible, avoid using specific MTAs and favor the unrestrictive distribution of mouse resources through simpler “conditions of use”, as regularly applied by The Jackson Laboratory (JAX) to all their mouse strains, and by EMMA-INFRAFRONTIER, for mouse lines non-associated to specific MTAs, in order also to reduce the administrative time to the minimum. In case MTAs should be included, for academic non-commercial use, the recommendations discussed were to simplify, and unify, the document as much as possible, ideally without requesting to disclose the field of use, without imposing reach through on modifications of the received materials and clearly defining third-party use after permission has been obtained. Attribution should also be clearly encouraged. Examples of simplified MTAs, also including useful institutional versions of these agreements, can be found at KOMP. The model deployed by AddGene, a non-profit organization dedicated to efficiently distribute plasmids among the scientific community, using also simple MTA procedures, was also presented as an example of successful solution.

Overall, this intense 2-day Infrafrontier-IMPC workshop fulfilled its aims and expectations. All stakeholders in the field could openly express their opinions, fears, opportunities, problems and solutions. The Organizers should be praised for their selection of speakers, topics and participants. Now it will be the time for the most difficult part: converting the agreements and recommendations into realities, while ensuring that researchers in academia, using mouse mutant resources, have an easier, simpler and faster access to mice and/or their associated products, for the benefit of science, and knowledge advance.

Infrafrontier-IMPC workshop: Promoting the international exchange of mouse mutant resources, Munich, Germany, 8-9 May 2014
Infrafrontier-IMPC workshop: Promoting the international exchange of mouse mutant resources, Munich, Germany, 8-9 May 2014

Updated scientific and workshop programmes for the TT2014 meeting in Edinburgh

Upades scientific and workshop programmes for TT2014 meeting in Edinburgh: Please, register today!.
Upades scientific and workshop programmes for TT2014 meeting in Edinburgh: Please, register today!.

The scientific and zebrafish transgenesis hands-on workshop programmes prepared for the 12th Transgenic Technology (TT2014) meeting, to be held in Edinburgh (Scotland, UK), on October 6-8 (workshop on October 8-10) 2014, have been recently updated by the Organizers, chaired by Douglas Strathdee (Glasgow, UK). These rewarding updates further increased the already high quality and interest for this popular conference series, promoted from the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT), the most important forum where to discuss the state-of-art of animal transgenic technology, to share new developments, to review the deployment of the new methods that have recently being devised and, in summary, an excellent arena where to easily meet, face-to-face, the most relevant key-players in the field while providing a wonderful excuse to gather and ex-change experiences with the entire ISTT family of members.

The updated list of confirmed invited speakers attending the TT2014 meeting (6-8 October 2014) includes:

  • David Adams, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK
  • Ignacio Anegon, Center for Research in Transplantation and Immunology, Nantes, France
  • James Bussell, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK
  • Ian Chalmers, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Stephen Ekker, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  • Anna-Katerina Hadjatonakis, Developmental Biology Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, USA
  • Peter Hohenstein, The Roslin Institute and Royal Dick School of Vetinary Studies & MRC IGMM, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Rudolf Jaenisch, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center Cambridge, USA
  • Jos Jonkers, Division of Molecular Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Keith Joung, Molecular Pathology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA
  • Alexandra Joyner, Developmental Biology Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, New York, USA
  • Koichi Kawakami, Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Michael McGrew, Division of Developmental Biology, The Roslin Institute and Royal Dick School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Daniel J Murphy, Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Glasgow, UK
  • James Murray, Department of Animal Science and Department of Population Health and Reproduction, University of California, Davis, California, USA
  • Stephen Murray, The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, USA
  • Lluis Montoliu, ISTT President, Organising Committee, National Center of Biotechnology (CNB), CSIC, Madrid, Spain
  • Vasilis Ntziachristos, Technische Universität Mu?nchen, Munich, Germany
  • Elizabeth Patton, MRC Human Genetics Unit & MRC IGMM, University of Edinburgh, UK
  • Pawel Pelczar, Institute of Laboratory Animal Science, Zürich, Switzerland
  • Jan-Bas Prins, Leiden University Medical Centre, The Netherlands
  • Janet Rossant, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (ISTT Prize)
  • Angelika Schnieke, Livestock Biotechnology, WZW Center of Life Science, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany
  • Kai Schönig, Central Institute of Mental Health, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany
  • William Skarnes, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK
  • Austin Smith, Wellcome Trust-Medical Research Council Stem Cell Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
  • Francis Stewart, Biotechnology Center of the TU Dresden, Germany
  • Sara Wells, MRC Harwell, Oxfordshire, UK
  • Jacqueline White, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge UK

The updated list of confirmed invited speakers & instructors attending the hands-on zebrafish transgenesis workshop taking place immediately after the TT2014 meeting (8-10 October 2014) includes:

  • Liz Patton, MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, The University of Edinburgh
  • Carl Tucker, Biomedical Research Resources, The University of Edinburgh
  • Tim Czopka, Centre for Neuroregeneration, The University of Edinburgh
  • Koichi Kawakami, Division of Molecular and Developmental Biology, National Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Stephen Ekker, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA
  • Keith Joung, Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School
  • Henry Roehl, Department of Biomedical Science, The University of Sheffield
  • Robert Kelsh, Centre for Regenerative Medicine and Department of Biology and Biochemistry, The University of Bath
  • Martin Denvir, The University of Edinburgh/British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science, The University of Edinburgh
  • David Lyons, Centre for Neuroregeneration, The University of Edinburgh
  • Dirk Seiger, Centre for Neuroregeneration, The University of Edinburgh
  • Karthikeyani Paranthaman, MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, The University of Edinburgh

Abstracts: All TT2014 participants are encouraged to submit their work as an abstract for poster presentation at the TT2014 meeting. Abstracts should be submitted no later than June 30, 2014. Accepted abstracts will be published in the scientific journal Transgenic Research (Springer), to which the ISTT is associated. A limited number of abstract submissions will be selected and invited to present their findings in the form of a short oral presentation within the main meeting program. Abstracts are invited on all aspects of Transgenic Technologies, including the conference themes as listed below:

  • New technologies in animal transgenesis
  • Embryo stem cells
  • Target nucleases or Editing nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs)
  • Large-scale phenotyping
  • Animal Biotechnology
  • Imaging with transgenic animals
  • Mouse models of human disease
  • Zebrafish models of human disease and transgenesis
  • Animal ethics and welfare

Registration for both the TT2014 meeting and the zebrafish transgenesis workshop are OPEN. Registration for the TT2014 meetings starts at 265 UK Pounds for technician/student ISTT members and progressively increases for the rest of categories of delegates. ISTT members are always entitled to reduced registration fees. Registration for the zebrafish transgenesis workshop is independent, with an extra cost of 275 UK Pounds , and only open to delegates that have also registered to attend the TT2014 meeting. The early bird reduced registration fees are operative until July 31, 2014. Thereafter, registration will be progressively become more expensive. Hence, please register by July 31, 2014 to benefit from reduced registration fees.

ISTT Registration Awards: Application to ISTT registration awards for the TT2014 meeting is OPEN. A minimum of six registration awards for ISTT members will be sponsored by the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). Applications should be sent, along with the registration confirmation and the requested additional documents to istt@transtechsociety.org by June 30, 2014. The ISTT will pay the Registration Fee of all applicants selected for an award. Please note that applicants not selected for an award are required to pay the coresponding registration fee. Please note the Award covers registration fees and attendance at all social events, however, does not cover travel, accommodation expenses or attendance at pre meeting events. Award decisions will be communicated by July 15, 2014 and awardees will receive a diploma at the TT2014 Meeting. Deadline for submitting application for ISTT Registration Awards for TT2014: 30 June 2014. Registration Award decisions will be communicated by 15 July 2014.

Looking forward to meeting you all in Edinburgh!

 

CARD-CNB Cryopreservation Course Report

Organizers, instructors, lecturers and participants at the CARD-CNB Cryopreservation Course, held at CNB-CSIC in Madrid, Spain, on 7-11 October 2013 and organized by Naomi Nakagata (CARD-University of Kumamoto, Japan) and Lluis Montoliu (CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain)
Organizers, instructors, lecturers and participants at the CARD-CNB Cryopreservation Course, held at CNB-CSIC in Madrid, Spain, on 7-11 October 2013 and organized by Naomi Nakagata (CARD-University of Kumamoto, Japan) and Lluis Montoliu (CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain)

This past week, 7-11 October 2013, the CARD-CNB Mouse Sperm and Embryo Cryopreservation Course was held at CNB-CSIC, in Madrid, Spain, with great success and accompanied with also great sunny weather. This was the first cryopreservation course of this kind, co-organized by Naomi Nakagata (CARD-University of Kumamoto, Japan) and Lluis Montoliu (CNB-CSIC, Madrid, Spain), were the newest methods developed by CARD, at the Nakagata lab, were demonstrated in Europe, directly by the CARD team. The instructors at this CARD-CNB course were commanded by the CARD-University of Kumamoto team, from Japan (Toru Takeo, Kiyoko Fukumoto, Tomoko Kondo, Yukie Haruguchi, Yumi Takeshita, Yuko Nakamuta and Shuuji Tsuchiyama), and additional help and collaboration was provided from the Mouse Biology Program at UC-Davis, CA, USA (Kristy Kinchen), from INIA, Madrid, Spain (Raúl Fernández), from CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain (Jesús Martínez), from USA (Jorge Sztein), from Paratechs, Lexington, KY, USA (Barbara Stone) and from CNB-CSIC (Julia Fernández, María Jesús del Hierro, Marta Castrillo and Isabel Martín-Dorado), for several of the methods demonstrated. All instructors must to be praised for their deep knowledge, patience and extraordinary dedication and commitment towards the success of this course. Complementary and most interesting lectures were provided on a wide variety of topics related to the course main focus, including: animal welfare and regulations by Belén Pintado and Jorge Guillén; the history, fundaments and comparison of methods by Jorge Sztein; the effects of the in vitro culture of mouse embryos by Alfonso Gutiérrez-Adán; safety and handling issues of liquid nitrogen by Jesús Martínez; shipping frozen and refrigerated materials by Toru Takeo, databases in a cryopreservation lab, by Shuuji Tsuchiyama, about EMMA by Lluis Montoliu and CARD by Naomi Nakagata, as examples of mouse embryo and sperm archives, and, also, on the new editing nucleases for genome modification, by Kai Schönig (Mannheim, Germany), a talk sponsored by Sigma.

As many as 24 participants, coming from research institutions or companies located in 16 countries around the world (UK, Spain, Australia, USA, Canada, Czech Republic, Brazil, Finland, France, Denmark, Israel, Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, Italy and Taiwan) were presented with the latest advances in mouse sperm and embryo cryopreservation and all associated mouse reproductive biology ancillary techniques.

The topics covered by the course included the following major areas: obtaining sperm from mouse cauda epididymis, obtaining unfertilized mouse oocytes, three different types of in vitro fertilization techniques (using fresh, frozen or refrigerated sperm), vitrification of unfertilized oocytes and 2-cell embryos (freezing and thawing), slow-method for freezing and thawing 2-cell embryos, refrigerated sperm and 2-cell embryos, abdominal and scrotal vasectomies, three types of embryo transfer (oviduct, uterus and non-surgical, with NSET tools), freezing and thawing mouse sperm and ICSI, among many additional common methodologies used to handle mouse embryos and gametes adequately.

The course was very intensive, but the kind atmosphere created by participants and instructors was excellent and, hence, all the tight and carefully devised demonstrations and practices, packed within a very busy schedule, could be run smoothly and successfully without problems. The vast experience in running this type of cryopreservation courses and the remarkable professionality of our colleagues from CARD-University of Kumamoto were key for the accomplished success. All methods followed their three-step learning process. At first, the theory and fundaments were briefly provided and summarized. Then, the method was demonstrated by instructors and, finally, the participants executed the procedures by themselves, with the help of instructors.

The participants left this cryopreservation course to return to their countries and institutions with the most satisfactory results obtained and with plenty of new information to digest, process and reproduce. All participants were given the task to spread the word and disseminate the use of these highly efficient and robust cryopreservation techniques that have boosted the field.

This CARDCNB cryopreservation course was sponsored by the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) and received the co-sponsorship and support from a number of companies whose contributions need to be greatly acknowledged as well: Leica, Charles River, Sigma, Labotect, Cosmo-Bio, Kyudo, Harlan and Paratechs.

Numerous ISTT events in June 2013

Numerous ISTT events in June 2013
Numerous ISTT events in June 2013

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) will be participating and/or co-sponsoring numerous events during the month of June 2013. At first, on June 7, 2013, our ISTT colleagues from Nantes (France), Ignacio Anegon and Séverine Ménoret, experts in the generation of transgenic rats, will be holding their 2013 Nantes Transgenic meeting on “Technical advances in the generation of transgenic animals and in their applications“. Next, on June 10-13, 2013, in Barcelona (Spain), the 12th FELASA-SECAL congress will take place, where the ISTT will be participating in two ways. First, the ISTT will co-sponsor the satellite workshop on Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation, to be held within the 2013 FELASA meeting, on 10 June 2013, Barcelona, Spain, and organized by ISTT members Jorge Sztein (NIH, USA) and Jesús Martínez-Palacio (CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain). Second, the ISTT will be participating as exhibitor and will attend the 2013 FELASA meeting. The ISTT will have a booth in Barcelona (#230), manned by the ISTT administrative assistant, Alison Cameron, and where all ISTT members (and non-ISTT members) are welcome to visiting us. Finally, immediately next, our ISTT colleagues from The Netherlands, Marian Van Roon (VU, Amsterdam) and Sjef Verbeek (LUMC, Leiden), have organized their 2013 Workshop on Innovative Mouse Models (IMM2013). This 7th Workshop on Innovative Mouse Models will be held on 13-14 June 2013, at the Leiden University Medical Center, LUMC, Leiden, The Netherlands, and the ISTT will be co-sponsoring also this event. ISTT members will be entitled to reduced registrations at all these events, proudly co-sponsored by the ISTT.

Mouse sperm cryopreservation: satellite workshop at the 2013 FELASA-SECAL Congress in Barcelona, Spain, 10 June 2013

Mouse sperm cryopreservation: satellite workshop at the 2013 FELASA-SECAL Congress in Barcelona, Spain, 10 June 2013
Mouse sperm cryopreservation: satellite workshop at the 2013 FELASA-SECAL Congress in Barcelona, Spain, 10 June 2013

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is pleased to announce the approved co-sponsorship of the Mouse Sperm Cryopreservation satellite workshop, organized by Jorge Sztein (NIH, Rockville, MD, USA) and Jesús Martínez Palacio (CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain), both ISTT members, in Barcelona (Spain) on 10 June 2013, within the activities associated to the 2013 FELASA-SECAL Congress in Barcelona, Spain, 10-13 June 2013. The main objective of this workshop is to acquaint students on reliable methods of mouse sperm cryopreservation, Jax and Nakagata, without requiring appliances or large investments to establishing a program at their centers. This course involves manipulation of animals and LN2.

This half-day satellite workshop will be held on 10 June 2013 from 09.00 to 12.00 h. at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Experimental Animal Unit. Satellite workshop registration fee: €120. Seats are limited to 24 participants. ISTT members, including those already registered to attend this workshop, are entitled to 25% discount. Interested participants should contact: felasa2013-registrations@mondial-congress.com

 

TT2013 meeting in China coming soon!

TT2013 meeting in China coming soon!
TT2013 meeting in China coming soon!

Dear colleagues,

In about two weeks, and starting on February 25, the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) will be holding the 11th Transgenic Technology (TT2013) meeting, at the Baiyun International Convention Center, in Guangzhou/Canton, Guandong, China, followed by the hands-on workshop on basic microinjection techniques. The TT2013 meeting is the most important event promoted from the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT). The TT2013 meeting is organized by Prof. Ming Zhao (China) and the subsequent hands-on workshop by Dr. Wenhao Xu (USA), Prof. Liangping Li (China) and Prof. Ming Zhao.

The official TT2013 meeting web site with all the relevant information for this ISTT conference is available from www.tt2013.org or www.tt2013.com

The TT2013 meeting web page within the ISTT web site is available from: www.transtechsociety.org/tt2013/

I would like to thank all Organizer and Advisory Committees, all Exhibitors and Sponsors for contributing with their work and support to the success of the TT2013 meeting.

See you soon in China!

Lluis

Updated program for the TT2013 meeting in China

Updated program for the TT2013 meeting in China
Updated program for the TT2013 meeting in China

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is pleased to announce the latest updated scientific program for the 11th Transgenic Technology (TT2013) meeting, which will be held in Guangzhou, China, on February 25-27, 2013, followed by a 3-day hands-on practical workshop on basic microinjection techniques, on February 28-March 2, 2013. The TT2013 Meeting is organized by Prof. Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou) and will be held at the Guangzhou Baiyun International Convention Center. The associated hands-on workshop is organized by Dr. Wenhao Xu (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA) in collaboration with Prof. Liangping Li (Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China), Prof. Jing An (Cancer Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China) and Prof. Ming Zhao. The practical workshop will be held at the Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou. Submission of late abstracts will be still accepted until January 24, 2013. Standard Registration fees apply until January 31, 2013. Registration to attend the TT2013 meeting should be done through the TT2013 meeting web site. Please register soon to attend the 2013 Edition of this world reference conference-series on animal transgenic technology.

The updated TT2013 program includes the following confirmed invited speakers:

  • Fernando Benavides (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX, USA)
  • Allan Bradley (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK) ISTT Prize
  • James Bussell (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK)
  • Shannon Byers (The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME, USA)
  • Michael Dobbie (Australian Phenomics Facility, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia)
  • Scott Fahrenkrug (Recombinetics, Minneapolis, MN, USA)
  • Malcolm France (Sydney, Australia)
  • Xiang Gao (Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, Nanjing, PR China)
  • Alfonso Gutiérrez-Adán (Dep. Animal Reproduction, INIA, Madrid, Spain)
  • Yann Herault (Institut Clinique de la Souris, ICS and IGBMC, Illkirch/Strasbourg, France)
  • Benoît Kanzler (Max-Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Freiburg, Germany)
  • Dietmar Kappes (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA)
  • Takashi Kohda (Department of Epigenetics, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan)
  • Thomas Kolbe (Biomodels Austria and Institute for Biotechnology in Animal Production, IFA-Tulln, Austria)
  • Takashi Kuramoto (Institute of Laboratory Animals, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan)
  • Liangxue Lai (Guangzhou Institute of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Science, Guangzhou, PR China)
  • Jinsong Li (Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Ning Li (State Key Laboratories for Agrobiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, PR China)
  • Depei Liu (Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, PR China) TT2013 Opening Lecture
  • Pentao Liu (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton/Cambridge, UK)
  • Kent Lloyd (University of California, Davis, CA, USA)
  • Kyle D. Lutes (Department of Computer and Information Technology-CIT Faculty, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov (Oregon National Primate Research Center, OHSU, Beaverton, OR, USA)
  • Naomi Nakagata (Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan)
  • Catheryn O’Brien (The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, Melbourne, Australia)
  • Masaru Okabe (Genome Information Research Center Research, Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan)
  • Jan Parker-Thornburg (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA)
  • Xin-an Pu (The Ohio State University, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA)
  • Toru Takeo (Center for Animal Resources and Development, Kumamoto University, Japan) ISTT Young Investigator Award
  • Zhu-Gang Wang (Shanghai Research Center for Model Organisms, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Guoliang Xu (Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, PR China)
  • Bo Zhang (College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, PR China)
  • Qi Zhou (The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, PR China)

2013 Workshop on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding and Welfare

Worshop on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding and Welfare, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK, 8-10 May 2013
Worshop on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding and Welfare, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK, 8-10 May 2013

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is most proud to support and co-sponsor, once again, the 2013 edition of the workshop on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding and Welfare, which will be held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK on 8-10 May 2013. This popular workshop is a collaboration between MRC Harwell, the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), the RSPCA Transgenic Training Working Group (TTWG) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. It aims to introduce experienced technicians and scientific staff involved with the management of genetically-modified mouse colonies to best practice with respect to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction, refinement) and animal welfare. The programme covers historical and current best practice in the maintenance of genetically-modified mouse colonies for scientific research and the differing disciplines involved in production, phenotyping and archiving.

The 2013 edition of this workshop is organized by ISTT Members James Bussell (WTSI) and Nikki Osborne (RSPCA), along with Neil Dear (SAHMRI) and Sara Wells(MRC-Harwell). The three-day program of this 2013 workshop will cover:
– Basic Genetics: what you need to know
– Fundamentals of Colony Management (including basic breeding calculations, e-resources & nomenclature)
– Mice in Biological Research (including establishing & maintaining GA and conditional lines, cryopreservation and archiving, mouse anatomy and necropsy)
– Health Monitoring and Wellbeing of Murine Colonies (including, GA resources, maintenance of high health status colonies, experimental design and what’s wrong with my mouse?)
All of these will be presented with particular attention to improving animal welfare and application of the 3Rs.

Instructors and Lecturers appointed to this 2013 workshop include:

  • James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK; ISTT Member
  • Neil Dear South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), Australia
  • Adrian Deeny University College London, UK
  • Martin Fray Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK; ISTT Member
  • Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK; ISTT Member
  • Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK
  • Helen Booler Royal Veterinary College, UK
  • Jacqui White Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
  • Derek Fry University of Manchester, UK
  • Michelle Hudson-Shore FRAME (Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments) UK
  • Ian Jackson Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, UK
  • Brendan Doe Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK; ISTT Member

ISTT members are entitled to a discount in workshop registration. Application deadline is 8 March 2013. Download 2013 workshop flyer; Download 2013 workshop application form

2013 Worshop web site