Dolly @ 20

Although she didn’t hit the limelight until February 1997 with a publication in Nature, Dolly-the-most-famous-sheep-in-the-world was born 20 years ago, on 5 July 1996 in The Roslin Institute in Edinburgh. Being the first mammal cloned from adult cells by a team led by Ian Wilmut, Dolly changed the way we look at the up-to-then-supposed irreversibility of development and paved the way for many other forms of reprogramming. Despite suffering from several illnesses early in life, including the well-known arthritis, Dolly was eventually humanely put down on 14 February 2003 when she was found to suffer from a viral form of lung cancer. Dolly’s remains are still on view in the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh. Concerns about a potential effect of cloning on premature or accelerated ageing have recently been addressed in a study from the University of Nottingham which shows that 13 cloned sheep, four of which clones from Dolly herself, aged normally.
To celebrate Dolly’s 20th birthday The Roslin Institute is organizing a series of scientific and public events to examine and celebrate her legacy. Public events include a debate in the ‘Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas’ as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, a public lecture and discussion featuring Professor Sir Ian Wilmut, Professor Angelika Schnieke and Noble Prize laureate Professor Shinya Yamanaka in the Surgeon’s Hall Museum in Edinburgh, and a public lecture by Sir Ian at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. A number of Dolly-related exhibits will also feature at The Roslin Institute Open Day on the 8 October. There will also be a scientific symposium on 2 September in The Roslin Institute Auditorium that will cover the latest advances in research fields that are linked to Dolly: animal biotechnology, stem cell pluripotency and regenerative medicine. Although the main auditorium is now full, it is still possible to register for a seat in adjacent rooms where the talks will be live-streamed.

Submitted by Peter Hohenstein

Dolly as a lamb with her Scottish Blackface surrogate mother.
Dolly as a lamb with her Scottish Blackface surrogate mother.
Dolly with Professor Sir Ian Wilmut, who led the research which produced her.
Dolly with Professor Sir Ian Wilmut, who led the research which produced her.

 

TARC X Meeting Report

20150809_084915 20150817_103359 20130810_163007Tahoe City, California, USA

August 9 – 13, 2015

“What if . . . we had cows that did not have horns? We do! This is a naturally-occurring mutation, and these are called “polled” (or, hornless) cows. This is a great benefit to the cattle industry, as this reduces the amount of trauma that cows can cause each other. Unfortunately, there are only a few types of cows that contain the mutation causing the polled phenotype. Other cows must have their horns removed to safely interact with each other in groups and their handlers. You can see that this type of “surgery” could also cause animal welfare issues.

But, what if we could transfer the naturally-occurring mutation from one type of cow to another? This can be accomplished by breeding the mutation into non-polled cattle. Keeping in mind that the time for gestation in cattle is 9 months, and then the time to sexual maturity could be another one to one and a half years, the time needed to do the number of crosses to generate this mutation in a new strain of cattle could be significant—one breeder’s lifetime. But (again, another “but”), what if we could introduce this mutation in a single generation by genetic engineering and leave no footprint behind—just this ONE MUTATION. It is now possible to do this using the CRISPR/Cas9 system; one could introduce the mutation and carefully characterize the animals that result to insure that there are no additional changes in the genome—no footprints. You could argue that this would be incredibly beneficial for animal welfare issues and for the benefit of those who care for these animals.”

This is the type of discussion that can result, based on the research presented at the Tenth Transgenic Animal Research Conference (TARC X) [http://www.cevs.ucdavis.edu/confreg/?confid=732] just completed in Lake Tahoe, California, USA. The discussions and talks centered around transgenic animals other than mice, including cows, sheep, goats and pigs, as well as avians (chickens), rabbits, and even mosquitoes! An especially valuable addition to the signature 10th Conference was the inclusion of reviews of different aspects of the technology given at the start of each session.

In the first session, Dr. Jim Murray (UC Davis, USA) reviewed how genetically engineered livestock have been developed for agriculture since the first TARC meeting in 1997. This was closely followed by a talk from Maeve Ballantyne (Roslin Institute, Scotland) about their efforts to engineer resilience to African swine fever into pigs. This disease is rapidly spreading from Africa throughout Eastern Europe. Thus, this type of genetic engineering could be critical for maintaining the health of swine herds. The following talk by Jayne Raper (CUNY, USA), was a natural extension in this session, discussing how genes encoding resistance to trypanosomiasis in non-human primates could be moved into sheep and cattle. The expectation is that such genes are critical for maintaining the health of these herds throughout Africa.

The second session was devoted to new technologies for genome engineering. It started with an excellent review from Bruce Whitelaw (Roslin Institute, Scotland). His review showed how the initial slow progress in generating precisely mutated animals has become much more rapid with the introduction of genome editing. The promise of this technology was soon demonstrated by Mark Tizard (CSIRO, Australia), who described efforts to edit the genome of poultry, and by Bhanu Teluga (University of Maryland, USA), who described his highly efficient CRISPR/Cas targeted genome editing in pigs.

After an afternoon break for hiking, shopping, boating and general fun in Lake Tahoe, there was a late afternoon poster session with submissions from throughout the world. After dinner, the evening session began with a talk from Pablo Ross (UC Davis). Pablo reviewed how pluripotent stem cells have been used to generate targeted livestock, and tantalized the audience with a promise of an upcoming publication describing a new media for growth of pluripotent stem cells from large animals, hopefully capable of generating chimeras and germline transmission. This was closely followed by talks from Franklin West (Univ. of Georgia, USA) and Jorge Piedrahita (NCSU, USA) about the use of stem cells in both pigs and chickens.

The second full day of the meeting was begun with a review by Chris Rogers (Exemplar Genetics, USA) on how genetically engineered livestock have been developed for biomedical models. Simon Bawden (SARI, AU) reported how Huntington’s disease has been recreated in sheep. This was followed by a talk from Lydia Garas (UC Davis, USA) about lysozyme transgenic goats whose milk can be used to prevent and treat intestinal diseases. After a short break, Mingjun Liu (China) described how the sheep FGF5 and MSTN genes have been altered using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. The final talk of the morning was from Margareth Capurro (Univ. of Sao Paulo, Brazil), where she captivated the audience with her description of the methods used to gain acceptance for release of GE mosquitoes to reduce the incidence of dengue fever in one Brazilian village. Margareth finished her talk with a most memorable jingle used as a public service announcement!

The Tuesday afternoon session was composed of talks from Eddie Sullivan (SABBiotherapeutics, USA) about the generation of humanized antibodies produced in cows, and from Lissa Herron (Roslin Institute, Scotland) about the isolation of pharmaceutical proteins from avian egg whites. These talks were then followed by an enthusiastic review from Tim Doran (CSIRO, AU) where he surveyed the advances made in engineering of the avian genome. A number of conference attendees added to their notoriety by being listed in his “Hall of Fame”! The final talk on Tuesday, given by Marie-Cecile van de Lavoir (Crystal Biosciences, USA), described the generation of transgenic chickens carrying Cre-recombinase, which can be used to delete selectable markers in vivo.

The final day of the regular conference began with a review by Kevin Wells (Univ. of Missouri, USA) of the regulations governing genetic engineered animals and the food supply. He emphasized that, in the US, while there are regulations that apply, there have not been laws passed that oversee this area, and he called for the preparation of a “white paper” by the experts in the field to advise the US government. His talk was followed by a presentation of the “Glo-fish”@ experience with obtaining US approval given by Alan Blake (Yorktown Technologies, USA). William Muir (Purdue Univ., USA) then presented his statistical model (Hazard Assessment at Critical Control Points, or HAACP) that can assess environmental risk of GE animals based on net fitness of the organism, demonstrating its effectiveness in an experiment on a model organism. He then showed its application to the Aquabounty@ salmon currently awaiting approval, showing that the fear of an accidental release is irrelevant, as the GE salmon would quickly be eliminated from the population.

The next session had talks from Jun Wu (Salk Institute, USA) on the development of pluripotent stem cells, and their use in the pig to generate humanized organs for transplant; and from Hiro Nakauchi (Stanford Univ., USA) on exploiting an “organ niche” by injecting pluripotent stem cells from one organism (rat) into another, deficient organism (Pdx1-/- mouse) to generate a xenogenic pancreas. He is now testing this process in pigs as well.

Attendees were then given another welcome afternoon off to play in the surrounding area, where there is ample opportunity for boating, biking and hiking. This being the final day of the regular conference, everyone truly welcomed this last chance to enjoy the lake and surrounding mountains.

The final session of the meeting began (after another poster session and dinner) with a review given by Heiner Niemann (Hannover, Germany), where he spoke about the use of pigs as xeno-donors for human organs. He described three major hurdles to this scenario, including immune responses, physiological incompatibilities, and the risk of transmitting zoonotic organisms. His own work is an attempt to modify the immune response by humanizing several candidate genes.

The last talk of the meeting was from Alison Van Eenennaam (UC-Davis, USA) about how the technology has progressed but the acceptance of transgenic food animals has not over the past twenty years that TARC meetings have been held. She made an eloquent request that scientists take the time to explain and assure the public that genetic engineering technology can be safe and assist the world with developing a healthy, sustainable food supply. The scientific portion of the meeting then ended with the presentation of the poster award (sponsored by the Roslin Institute) to Dorothea Aumann (Munich, Germany) for her poster on “Analyzing gamma/delta T-cell function in chicken by reverse genetics”. The award presentation was followed by a discussion of how to advance the regulatory environment.

An optional Livestock Industry Day was held the following day, 14 August, 2015, where various company representatives could share their work, interact with attending scientists, and have another enjoyable day in Lake Tahoe. All in all, it was a very informative, interesting, and pleasurable meeting. Granlibakken Conference Center [http://www.granlibakken.com], The UC Davis Department of Animal Science [http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu], Drs. Jim Murray, Elizabeth Maga, Alison Van Eenennaam and Pablo Ross should be commended for their hard work in producing such a successful gathering. The next meeting will be held August 13-17, 2017—please plan on attending!

 

 

Respectfully submitted by:
Jan Parker-Thornburg, with editing from Walter Tsark and Jim Murray

Tenth Transgenic Animal Research Conference, Tahoe City, California (USA), 9 – 13 August, 2015

TARC_2015blog

Plan to attend the 10th Transgenic Animal Research Conference (TARC X) in August of 2015. At this international meeting you will learn the latest developments in the field of non-murine transgenic animals. In celebration of the 10th conference in this series the program will contain nine review talks, to be published in a special issue of Transgenic Research. Once again the conference will be held at the beautiful Granlibakken Resort and Conference Center, high in the Sierra Nevada Mountains adjacent to beautiful Lake Tahoe. This meeting is co-sponsored by the ISTT.

Rooms are limited, so plan to register early. The conference web site opened February 1, 2015 for registrations and submission of poster abstracts. The following list of speakers confirms again that this is conference not to be missed. Additionally, in conjunction with Recombinetics, Inc there will be a special one day program on August 13th for the livestock, poultry and aquaculture industries on the application of GE animals. A list of confirmed speakers and topics, as well as additional information, registration and poster submission forms may be found on the conference web site (http://conferences.ucdavis.edu/transgenic). We invite you to join us for this interesting and important conference and learn more about the genetic future of the livestock industry.

Confirmed Speakers:

Reviews

  • Elizabeth Maga/Jim Murray (UC Davis) GE livestock for agriculture
  • Chris Rogers (Exemplar Genetics) GE livestock for biomedical models
  • Heiner Niemann (Hannover) Xenotransplantation
  • Tim Doran (CSIRO, Australia) GE Poultry
  • Pablo Ross (UC Davis) iPS/Stem cells
  • Jun Wu (Salk Institute) Organ complementation
  • Bruce Whitelaw (Edinburgh) Gene editing/gene targeting
  • Luciana Bertolini (Brazil) Production of pharmaceuticals
  • Kevin Wells (Missouri) Regulation of transgenic animals

Additional speakers and topics

  • Maeve Ballantyne (Roslin) African swine fever resistant pigs
  • Simon Bawden (Australia) Huntington’s disease sheep model
  • Jayne Raper (New York) Cattle resistant to trypanosomiasis
  • Lydia Garas (UC Davis) Effects of lysozyme milk on intestinal health
  • Jorge Piedrahita (NC State) SCID pigs
  • Margarthe Cupurra (Sao Paulo) GE mosquitos to control dengue fever
  • Lissa Herron (Roslin) Pharmaceuticals from eggs
  • Eddie Sullivan (SABBiotherapeutics) Targeting emerging infectious diseases through animal biotechnology
  • Hiro Nakauchi (Stanford) Interspecies blastocyst complementation

Advances in the Generation of Genetically Modified Animal Models: International Course & Symposium, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay), 7-18 September 2015

Advances in the Generation of Genetically Modified Animal Models: International Course & Symposium, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay), 7-18 September 2015
Advances in the Generation of Genetically Modified Animal Models: International Course & Symposium, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay), 7-18 September 2015

The International Society for Trangenic Technologies (ISTT) proudly co-sponsors the International Course & Symposium on Advances in the Generation of Genetically Modified Animal Models, to be held at the Institut Pasteur de Montevideo (Uruguay), organized by ISTT Members Martina Crispo (Unidad de Animales Transgénicos y Experimentación, UATE, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo) and Alejo Menchaca (Instituto de Reproducción Animal de Uruguay, IRAUy), on 8-15 September 2015.

The aim is to offer a training course of excellence for researchers and technicians working in animal transgenic field. The topics will be focused on both the basic knowledge and the latest advances in transgenic technologies. The course consists of a 1st week of lectures sessions and a 2nd week of practical sessions. In addition, a mini symposium (11-12 September) is organized in order to extend the impact of the presence of the professors to other researchers, technicians and posgraduate students. Current programs for the COURSE and MINI-SYMPOSIUM.

Confirmed speakers attending this Course and mini-Symposium include:

  • Michel Cohen-Tannoudji, IPParis, France
  • Francina Langa, IP Paris, France, ISTT member
  • Ignacio Anegón, INSERM, Nantes, France, ISTT member
  • Lluis Montoliu, CNB, Spain, ISTT member
  • Jorge Sztein, consultant, Spain
  • Sylva Haralambous, HPI, Greece, ISTT member
  • Naomi Nakagata, CARD, Kumamoto U, Japan, ISTT member
  • Charles Long, Texas A&M University, USA
  • Daniel Salamone, Fagro, UBA, Argentina
  • Adrian Mutto, UNSM, Argentina
  • Marcelo Rubinstein, INGEBI, Argentina, ISTT member
  • Marcelo Bertolini, UNIFOR, Brazil

Local professors and instructors include:

  • Magdalena Cárdenas, IP Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Ana Paula Mulet, IP Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Geraldine Schlapp, IP Montevideo, Uruguay, ISTT member
  • María Noel Meikle, IP Montevideo, Uruguay, ISTT member
  • Gabriel Fernández, IP Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Ana Paula Arévalo, IP Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Martina Crispo, IP Montevideo, Uruguay, ISTT member
  • Pedro C. dos Santos, IRAUy, Uruguay
  • Natalibeth Barrera, IRAUy, Uruguay
  • Federico Cuadro, IRAUy, Uruguay
  • Alejo Menchaca, IRAUy, Montevideo, Uruguay, ISTT member

People interested in participating in this COURSE must send the COURSE Application Form to tgcourse2015@pasteur.edu.uy
A maximum of 20 students will be accepted for the COURSE taking into account personal qualifications.
There is no registration fee for the COURSE. Support for accommodation, per diem and local transportation will be provided to all participants from abroad. Travel expenses are not included.
People interested in participating in the MINI SYMPOSIUM must send the SYMPOSIUM Registration Form to tgcourse2015@pasteur.edu.uy
SYMPOSIUM fee is U$S 100.

SAVE THE DATES!
Deadline for COURSE applications is June 28th
Deadline for SYMPOSIUM registrations is July 19th
For any further information contact: tgcourse2015@pasteur.edu.uy
www.pasteur.edu.uy/index.php/en/futurecourses

 

SALAAM kick-off meeting in Munich: thinking big (the important role of large animal models)

SALAAM kick-off meeting in Munich: 15-17 December 2014
SALAAM kick-off meeting in Munich: 15-17 December 2014

About a month ago, shortly before the season break, and very timely to enjoy its Christmas Market (Weihnachtsmarkt), the kick-off meeting of the Project SALAAM (Sharing Advances on Large Animal Models) took place in Munich (Germany), 15-17 December 2014, beautifully organized by Eckhard Wolf and Pascale Chavatte-Palmer, Chair and Co-Chair of this EU-COST Action BM1308. This conference, open to any interested researcher in the field, represented the official launch of the SALAAM project, to discuss about the role of large animal models in Translational Medicine, “Bridging the Gap between Basic and Clinical Research”, as indicated in the SALAAM logo. During these three days, about 120 scientists, including researchers not initially associated with SALAAM (including several ISTT members), gathered at the Gene Center, LMU Munich, to share their views about the role of large animal models in biomedicine.

The meeting started with a welcome address by Eckhard Wolf (LMU, Munich, Chair of SALAAM) who set the stage and underlined the need to use appropriate animal models for succeeding in translational research. In the past, large amount of resources have been devoted to rodents, mostly mice, in biomedicine, where mouse models have become instrumental for the current understanding of how most of our genes work and greatly facilitated the progress in the post-genomic era. However, in spite of mice being widely used in Biomedicine to model human diseases, often mice fail to accurately reproduce the features associated with a given human pathology. Therefore there is an urgent need to develop non-rodent animal models that would mimic aspects of human anatomy and human physiology more closely. Pigs, small ruminants and rabbits appear to be excellent candidates to follow up the preliminary discoveries made in mice, and they are the main purpose of the SALAAM initiative, through all the appointed participants, experts in these large animal models. The conference continued for its first day with lectures by A. Aartsma-Rus (NL), and S. Wildhirt (DE), who described examples of use of large animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and for the development of medical devices, respectively. The initial Ethical perspective on the use of large animals was provided by N. Stingelin (CH). This first day concluded with an interesting key-note lecture by M.M. Mohiuddin (USA) on the recent advances in pig-to-primate cardiac xenotransplantation.

On the second day, the conference presented the very large repertoire of methods and techniques that are currently available for Genetic Tailoring of large animal models. Angelika Schnieke (DE) introduced the state of art for the current genetic engineering of large animals, nicely summarizing many years of techniques and developments that have been successfully applied for the production of large genetically modified animal models. This initial talk was followed by a presentation by Lluis Montoliu (ES) on the use of CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to functionally analyze the role of non-coding genomic sequences, illustrated with some examples tested in mice, depicting the important role of rodents in proof-of-concept type of experiments, before undertaking subsequent experiments in larger animal models. B. Grzeskowiak (PL) presented an innovative set of nanomagnetic gene delivery vectors for transgenesis. Two additional talks illustrated the power of genetic engineering of the pig genome, using transposons (W.A. Kues, DE) or very elaborated gene cassettes for regulating and tracing disease genes (J.E. Jakobsen, DK). The session ended with a presentation from goats, where L. Boulanger (FR) reported the role of FOXL2 as a female sex-determining gene.

The SALAAM conference continued with a session devoted to systematic phenotyping initiatives of large animal models. At first, H. Fuchs (DE), presented the experience and phenotyping pipeline of the German Mouse Clinic, operating within the Infrafrontier consortium, and a good example of successful systematic phenotyping in mice. Next, Pascale Chavatte-Palmer (FR) discussed the achievements and challenges of imaging techniques in large animal models, through her studies on reproduction and fetal development. J. Tibau (ES) presented his interesting studies using pigs to analyze human obesity and to validate the effect of diets on the evolution of fat deposition using tomography approaches. A. Blutke (DE) introduced the impressive Munich MIDY-PIG Biobank initiative, as a unique resource for translational diabetes research. The two last talks presented the use of pigs as models for respiratory infections (K. Skovgaard, DK) or cystic fibrosis (I. Caballero, FR).

The last standard session of this SALAAM conference was devoted to discuss how to select the best animal model. This session began with an interesting presentation by J. Langermans (NL), who shared their initiative of non-human primate biobanking for translational medicine, a collaborative consortium where most of the nonhuman primate research centres in Europe were represented. He also discussed the unique features of non-human primates to investigate devastating diseases affecting us, such as the new infections (i.e. Ebola) or neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer, Parkinson) , often very challenging to be reproduced in non-primate animal models. Next, Antonio Gonzalez-Bulnes (ES) discussed the advantages and challenges of using pigs and sheep animal models, whereas L. Hiripi (HU) presented the unique features of the rabbit models. V. Huygelen (BE) discussed the use of piglets to investigate the human low birth weight cases , and A. Navarrete Santos (DE) further presented rabbits as ideal models for investigating diabetes during pregnancy. Diabetes research was also the focus of the last speaker of the session, G. Pennarossa (IT), whose experimental dessigns are focused on the use of dogs to explore cell therapy-based treatments.

The SALAAM first public conference ended with an excellent and very motivating talk by Karin Blumer (CH) on the ethical aspects of using large animals. She challenged the audience with the question whether “size did matter?” when it comes to Ethics and Animal Models. Her presentation nicely illustrated the different Ethical perspectives existing in the field and, most importantly, the relevant parameters that should be taken into account in order to properly address this question. She presented the “size” of an animal as an accidental attribute, not an intrinsic value, that must not determine its moral status. This presentation triggered an interesting and live discussion among the participants.

On the third and last day, the different working groups of SALAAM gathered first independently to discuss the next initiatives and eventually shared their conclusions in a combined general session. The planned initiatives will include the organization of practical workshops on CRISPR-Cas9 and transposon technologies, the generation of specific pig Cre-transgenic lines for the production of conditional pig mutant animal models, the need to standardize phenotyping protocols associated with additional specific training courses, the preparation of biobanks and associated databases for archiving and sharing tissues from large animal models, and the creation of a group to analyze the implementation of the 2010/63/EU Directive across Europe, the public perception and ethical issues of animal research, and the need for training to adequately communicate results to the public.

Information about future plans, initiatives and activities of the SALAAM EU-COST action will be available from its dedicated web site.

Transgenic Animal Technology. A Laboratory Handbook (3rd edition, 2014)

Transgenic Animal Technology. A Laboratory Handbook (3rd edition, 2014)
Transgenic Animal Technology. A Laboratory Handbook (3rd edition, 2014)

Twenty years after the publication of the first edition and twelve years after the release of the second edition of this book, Carl A. Pinkert (Auburn University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn, AL, USA) in association with Elsevier, releases now the third edition of his famous transgenic manual: “Transgenic Animal Technology. A Laboratory Handbook. 3rd edition, 2014“. As it will be familiar to readers of the two previous editions of this useful and unique handbook, this is not only a manual to understand how to make a transgenic mouse. This handbook looks beyond mice and it contains protocols to prepare a wide variety of genetically-modified animals, including: rats, rabbits, poultry, fish, pigs, ruminants and non-human primates. In addition, this compilation of helpful methods includes a number of chapters devoted to understand and improve all steps of transgenesis, from vector design, analysis of transgene integration and the evaluation of transgene expression. Finally, the book also includes cryopreservation methods, an embryo culture section, a review of standard nomenclature and a selection of databases and internet resources currently available in the field.

This handbook is a worth addition to any library, laboratory or transgenic facility, complementary to other available manuals on the subject, but unique in the sense that it exquisitely illustrates current transgenic methods that can be applied to a wide variety of animal species, beyond mice.

Carl A. Pinkert has been helped in his outstanding Editorial task by a large group of co-authors, experts in their subjects, including some ISTT members: Satoshi Akagi, Anna V. Anagnostopoulos, Benjamin P. Beaton, Cory F. Brayton, Steve Brown, Anthony W.S. Chan, Tom Doetschman, Rex A. Dunham, David A. Dunn, Janan T. Eppig, Almudena Fernandez, Tatiana Flisikowska, Vasiliy Galat, Robert A. Godke, Philip Iannaccone, Michael H. Irwin, Larry W. Johnson, Yoko Kato, Teoan Kim, Alexander Kind, Bon Chul Koo, Mo Sun Kwon, Daniel J. Ledbetter, Michael J. Martin, Kazutsugu Matsukawa, Colin McKerlie, Lluis Montoliu, Paul E. Mozdziak, Akira Onishi, Paul A. Overbeek, James N. Petitte, L. Philip Sanford, Jorge A. Piedrahita, Wendy K. Pogozelski, H. Greg Polites, Edmund B. Rucker III, Marina Sansinena, Angelika Schnieke, Kumiko Takeda, James A. Thomson, Ian A. Trounce, Yukio Tsunoda, Cristina Vicente-Garcia, Kevin D. Wells, Richard N. Winn and Curtis R. Youngs.

TT2014 abstracts: submission deadline is approaching (30 June)

TT2014 abstracts: submission deadline is approaching (30 June)
TT2014 abstracts: submission deadline is approaching (30 June)

From the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) we warmly invite and encourage you all to submit your most recent and exciting results and developments in animal transgenesis to be presented at the forthcoming 12th Transgenic Technology (TT2014) meeting, which will be held in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, on 6-8 October 2014. Deadline for submitting abstracts for the TT2014 meeting is June 30.
To submit an abstract please visit this TT2014 meeting web page.

All TT2014 participants are encouraged to submit their work as an abstract for poster presentation at the TT2014 meeting. Authors are requested to submit an abstract with the following requirements:

  • Title (max. 25 words)
  • Name authors and affiliations (first author is the presenting author).
  • Text of the communication (max. 400 words).
  • Abstracts should be submitted no later than June 30, 2014.

Accepted abstracts will be published in the scientific journal Transgenic Research (Springer), to which the ISTT is associated.

Posters
Posters will be on display in the exhibition area throughout the duration of the meeting. Poster boards are 1.00m wide x 2.00m high and we recommend posters do not exceed 1.50m in length. A supply of Velcro tabs will be available at the venue. No screws or double-sided adhesive tape will be allowed due to the damage they can cause to the boards.

Best Poster Awards
All posters presented at the TT2014 meeting will be eligible for one of the ISTT Best Poster Awards, generously sponsored by Charles River, Inc.

Oral Presentations
A limited number of abstract submissions will be selected and invited to present their findings in the form of a short oral presentation within the main meeting program. Should you be interested in being considered to speak at the meeting please select the appropriate option when submitting your abstract.

Abstracts are invited on all aspects of Transgenic Technologies, including the conference themes as listed below:

  • New technologies in animal transgenesis
  • Embryo stem cells
  • Target nucleases or Editing nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, CRISPRs)
  • Large-scale phenotyping
  • Animal Biotechnology
  • Imaging with transgenic animals
  • Mouse models of human disease
  • Zebrafish models of human disease and transgenesis
  • Animal ethics and welfare

We are looking forward to receiving your exciting works to discuss the latest development on animal transgenesis!. See you all in Edinburgh!

Highlights of the TT2014 meeting in Edinburgh: a conference you can’t miss!

The TT2014 meeting in Edinburgh (6-8 October 2014)
The TT2014 meeting in Edinburgh (6-8 October 2014)

This year’s ISTT main activity is the 12th Transgenic Technology conference, the TT2014 meeting, which will be held in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, on 6-8 October 2014, followed by a 2-day hands-on workshop on basic zebrafish transgenesis techniques. The ISTT promotes the TT meetings every 18 months, these being the most important activity of our Society. This year, the local Organizers and advisory committees, commanded by Douglas Strathdee, need to be praised for preparing a most appealing and interesting program, addressing hot topics, current and most up-to-date issues actively discussed nowadays by the transgenic animal community. Talks that will be presented by the most active and prestigious scientists in our field.

Why you shouldn’t miss the TT2014 meeting?

  • If you are interested in the new transgenic methods associated to nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPRs-Cas9) there will be plenty of interesting talks where these new fantastic tools will be presented and discussed, directly by the key players in this rapidly-evolving field, including: Rudolf Jaenisch, William Skarnes, Angelika Schnieke, Kai Schönig, Ignacion Anegon, Pawel Pelczar, Francis Stewart, Keith Joung and Feng Zhang. And, most likely, these techniques will be referred and cited in many additional talks too, including the round table discussion about the future of transgenic core facilities, chaired by James Bussell.
  • If you are interested in ES cell biology and in innovative uses of ES cells and associated technologies there will be unique talks delivered by Jos Jonkers, Austin Smith, Ian Chambers, Janet Rossant and Alex Joyner
  • If you are interested in phenotyping your mouse animal models there will be fantastic talks delivered by Jacqueline White, Stephen Murray, David Adams, Daniel Murphy, Anna-Katerina Hadjatonakis and Vasilis Ntziachristos
  • If you are interested in non-rodent, large mammals and birds, animal models there will be great talks by James Murray, Angelika Schnieke, Mike McGrew and Adrian Shermann
  • If you are interested in rats there will be compelling talks by Kai Schönig and Ignacio Anegon
  • If you are interested in zebrafish animal models there will be fascinating talks by Stephen Ekker, Koichi Kawakami, Keith Joung and Elizabeth Patton
  • If you are interested in animal welfare and 3Rs, in the best use of our laboratory animals, there will be captivating talks by Peter Hohenstein, Sara Wells and Jan-Bas Prins.

Therefore, there will be really engaging talks interesting to everyone in our field. This is why you shouldn’t miss this great and unique opportunity!.

Register now for the TT2014 meeting. Submission of abstracts will be accepted up to June 30. Early-Bird registration at reduced fees will be promoted up to July 31. ISTT members are entitled to reduced fee registration.

See you all in Edinburgh in October!

 

SALAAM: Sharing Advances on Large Animal Models

SALAAM: Sharing Advances on Large Animal Models
SALAAM: Sharing Advances on Large Animal Models

The EU-COST action SALAAM (Sharing Advances on Large Animal Models) was launched yesterday in Brussels, at a kick-off meeting attended by most of its members. This 4-year EU-COST action is currently formed by 17 countries and more than 44 participants, including many experts in the fields of animal genetics, physiology, transgenesis, bioethics, welfare and animal science, with a focus on large (i.e. non-rodent) animal models. This EU-COST action is chaired by Prof Eckhard Wolf (Germany) and vice-chaired by Dr. Pascale Chavatte-Palmer (France) and it includes various ISTT members such as Bruce Whitelaw (UK), Zsuzsanna Bosze (Hungary), András Dinnyes (Hungary), Cesare Galli (Italy) and Lluis Montoliu (Spain). In addition, another participant in this EU-COST action, Angelika Schnieke (Germany) is one of the invited speakers at the forthcoming 12th Transgenic Technology (TT2014) meeting to be held in Edinburgh (Scotland, UK).

EU-COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) is one of the oldest European initiatives in Science, an intergovernmental framework for European Cooperation in Science and Technology, allowing the coordination of nationally-funded research on a European level. SALAAM EU-COST action, as its acronym indicates, aims to sharing advances in genetic engineering and phenotyping of non-rodent mammals to develop predictive animal models for translational medicine. While recognizing the value of small and most popular animal models (mouse, rat, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, …) and its powerful genetics for increasing our knowledge on complex biological systems and for proof-of-concept-type experiments, this EU-COST action SALAAM focuses on large (i.e. non-rodent) mammalian models, since these may bridge the gap between proof-of-concept studies and more effective clinical trials, leading to better translational animal models for the study of human diseases. The research projects undertaken using rodent and non-rodent animal models should not be perceived as competition or opposed initiatives, rather as complementary studies, where each animal species is selected according to its particular value and expected benefits for the ultimate goal, that is, our understanding on the function of the mammalian (i.e. human) genome and the eventual development of effective treatments for many human diseases. During the course of this EU-COST action several conferences and training workshops will be organized, open to anyone interested in the field, to discuss about (1) new technologies (including the application of genome editing nucleases, i.e. CRISPR-Cas, for the generation of improved genetically altered animal models); (2) defining best animal models for specific phenotyping studies; (3) creation of databases for sharing information on animal models creates, tissues available and protocols; and (4) animal welfare, bioethics and communication to the public. All these conferences and training courses will be adequately advertised through the ISTT web site.

At the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) we care about the generation and the analysis of “all” genetically altered animals, not only focused in the classical rodent models, but also including the work done with other species, with large animal models, in livestock. In this regard, the ISTT has been traditionally supporting conferences on non-rodent transgenic animals, organized in Tahoe by ISTT Member Jim Murray (UC Davis, USA) and has promoted a web page within the ISTT web site where most of the advances on livestock and other non-rodent genetically modified animal resources are shared. At the next 12th Transgenic Technology (TT2014) meeting, which will be held in Edinburgh on 6-8 October 2014, the Conference Organizers (Douglas Strathdee-Chair, Peter Hohenstein and Bruce Whitelaw) have scheduled a session on animal biotechnology, where the recent work accomplished using large animal models will be discussed. In addition, immediately following the TT2014 meeting, a hands-on workshop on zebrafish transgenesis methods will be offered to interested participants.

Livestock and other non-rodent genetically modified animal resources available from the ISTT web page

Livestock and other non-rodent genetically modified animal resources available from the ISTT web page
Livestock and other non-rodent genetically modified animal resources available from the ISTT web page

There is life beyond mice and rats, there are many additional interesting and useful genetically-modified animal models beyond those made using rodents. Rodents are great animal models for genetic/genomic analyses and for the first preliminary experimental tests. However, larger mammals are more suitable to study most human diseases and to develop therapies and treatments. Likewise, other vertebrates, such as chicken and fish, are also very interesting and useful to develop applications in animal biotechnology. At the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) we have an increasing population of members working with all these other non-rodent genetically modified animals. The reference meeting in this area is the Transgenic Animal Research Conference (TARC), organized by ISTT Member James Murray (UC Davis, CA, USA) every two years, in August. The ISTT has had the pleasure to co-sponsor the last three editions of this conference series, in 2009, 2011 and 2013. In addition, in response to an increased interest by new ISTT members, a session devoted to non-rodent transgenic animals has been regularly scheduled in the last TT meetings (i.e. TT2011 and TT2013).

Now, from the ISTT web site, we would like to contribute disseminating and informing about all these other non-rodent transgenic animal models by launching a new web page with a collection of available resources for livestock and other non-rodent genetically modified animals. This page contains links to several academic and private institutions working with non-rodent transgenic animals. The list is not exhaustive and will be progressively updated and expanded with your suggestions and recommendations. Hence, if you are working in this field and your web page is not yet included in this web page, please contact us at webmaster@transtechsociety.org and we will correct, modify or add your suggested information. Thanks in advance for your expected collaboration!.