Allan Bradley will be awarded the 9th ISTT Prize at the TT2013 meeting

Allan Bradley will be awarded the 9th ISTT Prize at the TT2013 meeting (Picture kindly provided by WTSI)
Allan Bradley will be awarded the 9th ISTT Prize at the TT2013 meeting (Picture kindly provided by WTSI)

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is pleased to announce that Professor Allan Bradley, Director Emeritus of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI), and leader of the Mouse Genomics Team at WTSI, will be awarded the next (9th) ISTT Prize for his outstanding contributions to the field of transgenic technologies. Professor Allan Bradley will receive the award at the next Transgenic Technology meeting (TT2013), which will be held in Guangzhou (PR China) on February 25-27, 2013. This award has been agreed upon by the ISTT Prize Committee, consisting of the ISTT President and Vice-President, the CEO of genOway, as the company generously sponsoring the award, and the previous ISTT Prize awardees.

In awarding this prize to Dr. Bradley, the ISTT Prize committee acknowledges his many fundamental contributions to the science and technology of manipulating the mouse genome. His pioneering mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell work in the 1980s, demonstrating germ-line transmission and the great potential of ES cells to generate mice carrying mutations in endogenous genes, established milestones in a field that saw the award of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Mario Capecchi, Martin Evans, and Oliver Smithies. Later, Dr. Bradley generated a number of broadly relevant knockout mouse models (for example p53, Rb, Wnt-1) that are still used regularly today. His subsequent research has developed new methods for the genetic analysis and genetic modification of mice (such as chromosome engineering and the functional genetic analysis of mouse chromosome 11). These developments have been instrumental for advancing mouse genetics studies and the use of mice to understand the human genome. Furthermore, his strong vision and leadership at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, which he directed from 2000-2010, was key to creating the EUCOMM/KOMP (IKMC) initiative to systematically disrupt every gene in the mouse genome, resulting in a massive impact on the field of transgenic technologies.

Dr. Bradley received his BA, MA and PhD in Genetics from the University of Cambridge. His PhD studies in Martin Evans’ laboratory, completed in 1984, laid the foundation for making knockout mice.

In 1984 Allan Bradley and Liz Robertson demonstrated that ES cells could be transmitted through the germ-line of mice (Bradley et al. 1984, Nature) and two years later reported that ES cells could be used to generate mice with mutations in endogenous genes (Kuehn, Bradley et al. 1987, Nature).

In 1987, he took an appointment as Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. He was named as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator in 1993 and was promoted to full Professor in 1994. At Baylor, his laboratory played a seminal role in developing the methods, technology and tools for genetic manipulation in the mouse. As a result, mice can now be generated with changes as subtle as an alteration in a single nucleotide or as massive as the deletion, duplication or inversion of millions of base pairs with a technology now known as chromosome engineering (Ramirez-Solis et al. 1995, Nature). The Bradley laboratory used ES cell technology extensively, generating and analysing many of the first generation of mouse knockouts (McMahon & Bradley, 1990, Cell; Donehower et al. 1992, Nature; Lee et al. 1992, Nature; Jones et al. 1995, Nature; Sharan et al. 1997, Nature) while helping numerous other laboratories to utilize this technology. This work has provided key functional information for many genes with an emphasis on cancer, DNA repair and embryonic development. While at Baylor, Bradley created the Mouse Club, originally consisting of meetings among his, Phil Soriano’s, and Gerard Karsenty’s laboratories, with Richard Behringer’s lab joining later. The Mouse Club has since expanded and has been meeting for more than two decades, every Tuesday afternoon. Richard Behringer remembers: “I was always impressed that Allan would always attend the Mouse Club if he was in town. He put training of students and postdocs as a high priority.” Many former colleagues and trainees from Allan Bradley’s lab have fond memories of his mentoring and support. Y. Eugene Yu says: “When tropical storm Allison flooded Houston and the Texas Medical Center in 2001, which killed 90,000 research animals, Allan flew in from UK immediately after the news broke. He personally led the effort in the devastated animal facility to rescue the remaining precious mouse strains, many of which were unique.”

In November 2000, Allan Bradley returned to the United Kingdom as Director of the Sanger Centre, now called the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI), shortly after the first draft of the human genome sequence was released. In 2002, he oversaw the publication of the mouse genome sequence.

His 10-year plan for the WTSI aimed to transform it from a centre that just sequences DNA to one that studies the biology of sequences. First focussing on creating the required physical infrastructure, then diversifying the institute’s research, his efforts have helped turn the WTSI into an international hub of science, with strong programs in human genetics, informatics, pathogen genetics, and model organisms. Among other projects in which the WTSI plays a leading role is the largest systematic gene knockout project ever attempted in ES cells, funded by the European Union (EUCOMM) and National Institutes of Health (KOMP), and now coordinated by the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) (Skarnes et al., 2011 Nature; Prosser et al., 2011 Nature Biotechnology).

Under Allan Bradley’s direction, the WTSI has become a reference centre for outreach activities, offering teaching resources, welcoming students for work placements and promoting school visits that broadcast scientific achievements to the general society; in his words “inspiring the next generation of scientists.”

Allan Bradley has also been very active in commercializing the numerous novel methods his laboratory has developed over the years to engineer the genomes of mice. He is registered as a co-inventor on more than 25 patents and is a founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Kymab Limited. He also co-founded several companies, including GenPharm International and Lexicon Genetics in 1995. Using proprietary gene trapping and gene targeting technologies, Lexicon Genetics created the world’s first large repository of genetically modified mouse embryonic stem cells, known as OmniBank, and established a large-scale program to discover the physiological and behavioural functions of mammalian genes, with almost 5,000 gene knockouts studied in mice. This effort is now being extended to the entire mouse genome in a public domain project coordinated by the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) and funded by NIH in the USA and other funding bodies internatioanlly.

In July 2002 Allan Bradley was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. He has authored over 260 scientific articles and book chapters and currently runs an active research group that is exploring gene function on a large scale and continues to develop new tools and technologies for mouse genetics research.

The ISTT Prize: a piece of art created by Bela Rozsnyay
The ISTT Prize: a piece of art created by Bela Rozsnyay

Allan Bradley will join in 2013, at the TT2013 meeting, the following group of outstanding scientists previously awarded the ISTT Prize:

Ralph L. Brinster, ISTT Prize, TT2011, Florida, USA, Prize Announcement, Award ceremony
A. Francis Stewart, ISTT Prize, TT2010, Berlin, Germany, Prize Announcement, Award ceremony
Brigid Hogan, ISTT Prize, TT2008, Toronto, Canada, Prize Announcement, Award ceremony
Charles Babinet, TT2007, Brisbane, Australia, Obituary (1939-2008)
Andras Nagy, TT2005, Barcelona, Spain
Qi Zhou, TT2004, Uppsala, Sweden
Kenneth C. McCreath, TT2002, Munich, Germany
Teruhiko Wakayama, TT2001, Stockholm, Sweden

Download this Award Announcement as a ISTT Press Release Document

I International Mouse Meeting at CECs, in Valdivia, Chile

I International Mouse Meeting at CECs, in Valdivia, Chile
I International Mouse Meeting at CECs, in Valdivia, Chile

The I International Scientific Meeting for the Optimization of Murine Models in Research was held last week in Valdivia (Chile), at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECs). This meeting, co-sponsored by the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT), was organized by Juan Manuel Baamonde (CECs) in collaboration with the Organizing Committee [Fernando Benavides (MD Anderson CC, USA), Jorge Sztein (NIH, USA) and Pablo Cid, Marisol Costa, Carlos Flores, Bredford Kerr and Marta Treimun from CECs] and with the support of the CECs Scientific Director, Francisco Sepulveda.

This pioneer initiative attracted to Valdivia, a beautiful and one of the oldest Chilean towns, more than 200 participants from many different South-American countries, USA, Mexico, Ireland, Italy and Spain. The meeting ended last Thursday with an extraordinary success, thanks to its attending delegates and the Posters they brought, and, particularly, to the most interesting talks delivered by the selected invited speakers, coming, mostly, from Chile, but also from Mexico, Brazil, USA, Ireland, Italy and Spain, including those given by ISTT Members: David Valenzuela, Venus Lai, Fernando Benavides, Jorge Sztein and Lluis Montoliu. Talks were delivered and discussed in English, Spanish or Portughese. The meeting was followed by a 1-day practical course on mouse sperm freezing according to the Jackson and Nakagata CARD methods, organized by Jorge Sztein, in collaboration with Jesús Martínez (CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain) and Marta Treimun. The course was followed by 17 participants.

I International Mouse Meeting at CECs, in Valdivia, Chile
I International Mouse Meeting at CECs, in Valdivia, Chile

Chile, too often unfortunately associated to earthquakes and other natural disasters, demonstrates with this successful mouse meeting, that is part of the group of South-American countries that have decided to invest in scientific research using laboratory animals, mostly rodents, with professional and up-to-date equipment and animal facilities, at the international level. This meeting in Valdivia nicely served to illustrate the high level of scientific research involving genetically-modified mice that is being conducted nowadays in Chile, with the CECs as one of the leading institutions in the country. The use of mice as animal models for human disease has been the subject of various previous successful meetings and courses organized in Brazil (Sao Paulo-2008 and Campinas-2010) and Uruguay (in 2008 and 2011). The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is proud to have supported and co-sponsored all of them.

Organizing and Advisory Committees for the TT2013 meeting

Baiyun International Convention Center in Guangzhou (PR China), venue of the TT2013 meeting
Baiyun International Convention Center in Guangzhou (PR China), venue of the TT2013 meeting

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is pleased to announce the Organizing and Advisory Committees established for the next Transgenic Technology meeting, TT2013, which will be held at the Baiyun International Convention Center (BICC), in Guangzhou, PR China, on February 25-27, 2013, organized by Prof. Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, PR China). A 3-day hands-on practical workshop on fundamental and specialized techniques in animal transgenesis will follow, after the TT2013 meeting, on February 28-March 2, 2013. Additional information about invited speakers, topics to be covered and discussed during the TT2013 meeting, as well as the methods that will included and taught during the practical workshop will be regularly updated in the official TT2013 meeting web site (www.tt2013.org). Questions, suggestions, comments, companies/institutions willing to attend and co-sponsor this conference, expressions of interest to attend this meeting as exhibitors, etc… can be directed to the official TT2013 meeting email address: tt2013@transtechsociety.org

TT2013 meeting: Committees
Organizer of the TT2013 meeting: Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)

Organizing Committee
Yong Jiang (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China) President
Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China) Executive General Secretary
Thomas Blom (Lund University, Lund, Sweden)
Ragnar Mattsson (Lund University, Lund, Sweden)
Qiaobing Huang (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Jinghua Liu (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Weiwang Gu (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Wenqing Zhang (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Jing An (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Liangping Li (Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China)
Lluis Montoliu (National Center of Biotechnology, CSIC, Madrid, Spain)
Thom Saunders (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA)
Jan Parker-Thornburg (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA)
Boris Jerchow (Max Delbrück Center, Berlin, Germany)

International Scientific Advisory Committee
Lluis Montoliu (National Center of Biotechnology, CSIC, Madrid, Spain), Chair
Thom Saunders (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA)
Jan Parker-Thornburg (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA)
Boris Jerchow (Max Delbrück Center, Berlin, Germany)
Bruce Whitelaw (Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)
Kent Lloyd (University of California, Davis, CA, USA)
Wenhao Xu (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA)
Teruhiko Wakayama (Center for Developmental Biology, RIKEN, Kobe, Japan)
Karen Brennan (The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute, Sydney, Australia)
Benoît Kanzler (Max-Planck Institute for Immunobiology, Freiburg, Germany)

Chinese Scientific Advisory Committee
Kaitai Yao (Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou), Chair
Zuoyan Zhu (Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing)
Yitao Zeng (Institute of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai)
Ning Li (State Key Laboratories for Agrobiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing)
Qi Zhou (The State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing)
Xiao Yang (Institute of Bioengineering, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing)
Peng Xiang (Center for Stem Cell Biology and Tissue Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou)
Xiang Gao (Model Animal Research Center of Nanjing University, Nanjing)
Kui Li (Institute of Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing)
Weide Lao (Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing)
Biliang Zhang (Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou)
Zhaoduan Ren (Institute of Medical Genetics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai)
Liangxue Lai (Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou)
Ming Zhao (Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou)
Yong Jiang (Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou)
Weiwang Gu (Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou)
Wenqing Zhang (Department of Cell Biology, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou)
Jing An (Cancer Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou)
Hong Wei (Department of the Experimental Zoology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing)
Xianzhu Xia (Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing)
Qimin Zan (Cancer Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing)
Xuetao Pei (Institute of Transfusion Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing)
Shaorong Gao (National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing)
Duanqing Pei (Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou)

Practical Workshop
Wenhao Xu (University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA), Chair
Ming Zhao (Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Jing An (Cancer Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China)
Liangping Li (Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China)

Happy Birthday ISTT !!!

Happy Sixth Anniversary ISTT!!!
Happy Sixth Anniversary ISTT!!!

Today, the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is six years old. We started to discuss the idea of founding this Society shortly after the 6th Transgenic Technology meeting (TT2005), held in Barcelona in September 2005, and, thereafter, it took us only a couple of months, with the great help of a few highly devoted and generous people, to find out what was required and, eventually, to register the Society in a country, Spain, at the International level. The official registration took place on January 18th, 2006, exactly six years ago. Nowadays, we are running and enjoying a Society with almost 600 members, very actively involved in many meetings, workshops, courses where the common thread is the discussion, training, education on all aspects of the generation and analysis of genetically modified animals, according to our Society aims, and as indicated in our Society bylaws. Let’s celebrate this sixth anniversary. Please join us in raising your glasses in this toast, and say along with us: Happy Birthday ISTT!!!

ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)
ISTT co-sponsors Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare (6-8 June 2012, WTGC, Hinxton, UK)

The International Society for Transgenic Technology (ISTT) is most pleased to announce the co-sponsorship of the 2012 Edition of the popular training Course on Managing Mouse Colonies: Genetics, Breeding & Welfare, organized as a collaborative effort by four institutions: MRC Harwell, the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, the RSPCA Transgenic Training Working Group (TTWG) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. The course will be held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, UK, on June 6-8 June 2012. Registration deadline: 29 February 2012. ISTT members are entitled to a reduced registration fee.

This training Course aims to introduce experienced technicians and scientific staff involved with the management of genetically-modified mouse colonies to best practice with respect to the 3Rs and animal welfare. The programme covers historical and current best practice in the maintenance of genetically-modified mouse colonies for scientific research and the differing disciplines involved in production, phenotyping and archiving. Topics covered will include: Topics covered will include: nomenclature, basic colony management, maintaining transgenic and gene-targeted lines, breeding for experimental purposes and maintenance of high health status colonies.

Scientific organisers
James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT member
Neil Dear Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK
Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK
Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK

Keynote speakers
Karen Steel Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Ian Jackson Medical Research Council Human Genetics Unit, UK

Confirmed tutors
James Bussell Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT member
Neil Dear Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK
Adrian Deeny University College London, UK
Martin Fray Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK, ISTT member
Richard Houghton Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, ISTT Member
Natasha Karp Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Nikki Osborne RSPCA, UK
Sara Wells Medical Research Council, Harwell, UK
Jacqui White Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK
Ben Woodman Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, UK


Murine Models in Research and Sperm Cryopreservation in Valdivia

I International Scientific Meeting for the Optimization of Murine Models in Research and III Practical Course CECs: Mouse sperm freezing according to JAX method, Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs), Valdivia, Chile  24-27 January 2012
I International Scientific Meeting for the Optimization of Murine Models in Research and III Practical Course CECs: Mouse sperm freezing according to JAX method, Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs), Valdivia, Chile 24-27 January 2012

In about two weeks, the International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) is co-sponsoring the I International Scientific Meeting for the Optimization of Murine Models in Research and III Practical Course CECs: Mouse sperm freezing according to JAX method, which will be held at the Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs), Valdivia, Chile 24-27 January 2012. This event is organized by Juan Manuel Baamonde (CECs) and co-organized by ISTT Members Jorge Sztein (Bethesda, MD, USA) and Fernando Benavides (Smithville, TX, USA). The list of invited speakers include also other ISTT Members, such as David Valenzuela (Regeneron, US), Venus Lai (Regeneron, US) and Lluis Montoliu (CNB, Madrid, Spain). The scientific program for the meeting covers a wide range of topics in murine transgenesis, animal models of human disease and animal welfare.

 

Happy New Year! ISTT calendar for 2012 and renewal period open

The ISTT wishes you all a happy new year and all the best for 2012
The ISTT wishes you all a happy new year and all the best for 2012

The International Society for Transgenic Technologies (ISTT) wishes you all a happy new year and all the best for 2012. Like every beginning of the year the renewal period for ISTT memberships is open. Please visit the join/renew page and follow the instructions therein. You may wish to download a year 2012 ISTT wall Calendar, created with free web resources. ISTT Members are entitled to a monthly calendar for 2012 with images from St. Pete Beach, Florida, where we held our last TT2011 meeting. Looking forward to receive and process all your renewals requests and registrations!. Thanks for your continuous support to the ISTT.