Genome sequencing of 17 mouse inbred strains

Mouse genomic variation and its effect on phenotypes and gene regulation. Keane et al. Nature 2011, 289–294,  (15 September 2011), doi:10.1038/nature10413
Mouse genomic variation and its effect on phenotypes and gene regulation. Keane et al. Nature 2011, 289–294, (15 September 2011), doi:10.1038/nature10413

Most of our current understanding and genome research in mice has been based, so far, on the genome of the mouse inbred strain C57BL/6J, published in 2002 and accessible through a number of genome browsers, such as Ensembl. Yesterday, Keane et al. published in Nature the results of their sequencing efforts and the release of the genome sequences from 17 additional mouse inbred strains: C3H/HeJ, CBA/J, A/J, AKR/J, DBA/2J, LP/J, BALB/cJ, NZO/HlLtJ, NOD/ShiLtJ, 129S5SvEv<Brd>, 129P2/OlaHsd, 129S1/SvImJ, C57BL/6NJ, and the four wild-derived inbred strains CAST/EiJ, PWK/PhJ, WSB/EiJ and SPRET/EiJ. This is an enormous amount of information, obtained using next-generation sequencing, that these researchers from The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and other collaborating institutions now release to the public scientific community. Most of these inbred strains are very relevant in biomedical research and they are regularly used for the generation of genetically-modified mice. Notably, among them the C57BL/6NJ inbred strain, selected by the International KnockOut Mouse Consortium (IKMC) to produce the collection of systematic gene knockouts covering the entire mouse genome. This publication and the subsequent analyses derived from this study should greatly contribute to our understanding of the genetic diversity among different mouse strains and the different phenotypes that are often observed across inbred strains, associated with identical genetic modifications.

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